Louisville Magazine

AUG 2015

Louisville Magazine is Louisville's city magazine, covering Louisville people, lifestyles, politics, sports, restaurants, entertainment and homes. Includes a monthly calendar of events.

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68 LOUISVILLE MAGAZINE 8.15 Dana Settles KentuckyOne Health Medical Group– Anesthesia Associates 200 Abraham Flexner Way 587-4404 Richard Morris One Anesthesia–Anesthesia Associates of Louisville 320 Whittington Pkwy., Suite 301 690-8782 Kenneth Thielmeier Anesthesiology Consultants Enterprises 1 Audubon Plaza Drive 636-7160 Michael Bouvette Anesthesiology Consultants Enterprises One Audubon Plaza Drive 636-7160 Christopher LaMont Hellman One Anesthesia–Williams & Wagner P.O. Box 34748 473-2132 Patrick Shanahan Anesthesiology Consultants Enterprises 1 Audubon Plaza Drive 636-7160 Deborah Jane Schultz One Anesthesia- Anesthesia Associates of Louisville 320 Whittington Pkwy., Suite 301 690-8782 Cardiovascular Diseases Henry Sadlo UofL Physicians–Cardiovascular Medicine 401 E. Chestnut St., Suite 310 588-4600 Steven J. Raible Norton Heart Specialists 6420 Dutchmans Pkwy., Suite 200 891-8300 Chris Anggelis KentuckyOne Health Cardiology Associates– Louisville Heart Specialists 201 Abraham Flexner Way, Suite 1101 581-1951 Brian T. Beanblossom Norton Heart Specialists 4420 Dixie Highway Suite 118 891-8575 William Dillon Baptist Health Medical Group–Louisville Cardiology Group 3900 Kresge Way, Suite 60 893-7710 Connie Anggelis KentuckyOne Health Cardiology Associates– Louisville Heart Specialists 201 Abraham Flexner Way, Suite 1101 581-1951 Joseph A. Lash Norton Heart Specialists 6420 Dutchmans Pkwy., Suite 200 891-8300 Smock, whose job title is surgeon for the Louisville Metro Police Department, was the frst physician in the United States to do a fellowship in clinical forensic medicine, which is basically the application of forensics to a living patient. "When we think of forensics, we usually think of pathologists and that kind of stuff," Smock says. "Back in the late '80s and early '90s, we created a program here in Louisville to train physicians and nurses in the forensic evaluation of the living victim. My thought was that I don't want you to have to die to avail yourself of the services of a forensically trained healthcare professional." What about the specialty appealed to you? "If you're walking into your building today and someone shoots you, there's evidence on your clothing or on your body that would assist the police in determining who did it or how it happened. Typically when a victim comes into the emergency room, the physicians and nurses aren't trained to recognize and preserve evidence. If the evidence is preserved, documented and correctly interpreted, then the police can help you make sure that justice is served to the person who shot you. If you go to a hospital where they're not trained, where evidence is lost or wounds are incorrectly interpreted, the police say, 'I'm very sorry, but we can't proceed with your case because evidence was destroyed by the people at the emergency room.'" Any examples of doctors misinterpreting evidence? "When it comes to gunshot wounds, when I ask doctors, nurses and police how to determine an entrance wound from an exit, they tell me, 'Based on the size of the wound.' Which is not true. If you get shot and you have two holes, one small and one large, and the doctor incorrectly interpreted the large wound as the exit and the small one as the entrance when it was vice versa, that can cause problems and complicate the seeking of justice." What's a new technology that's helped you in your work? "(LMPD) Chief Steve Conrad just purchased a rhinolaryngoscope that I can put in the nose or the mouth of a strangulation victim and look for injuries in the back of the throat. It tells me if there was enough force used to cause injury to the throat, which is what the jurors, prosecutors and defense want to know. It tells me if the injuries are consistent or inconsistent with what the victim says." Do you work with DNA evidence often? "We collect DNA evidence from suspects and victims. For example, we had a case yesterday where the question was if someone was assaulted or pushed. Or did they fall? So we're collecting DNA, swabbing the skin, what we call 'touch DNA.' So we're trying to fgure out: Was there contact between a potential suspect and victim that would show that (the suspect's) hands were on this victim?" DR. William smock alz.org/walk

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